United Pilots Fight Against Mandatory Overtime

Fewer than half of all United Air lines flights have left on
time–defined as with in 14 minutes of the scheduled time–
since Memorial Day. Things have been even worse in August.
For the first 10 days of the month, on-time performance was
down to 40 percent.

Why? Mostly because pilots are refusing to work overtime.

Fewer than half of all United Air lines flights have left on
time–defined as with in 14 minutes of the scheduled time–
since Memorial Day. Things have been even worse in August.
For the first 10 days of the month, on-time performance was
down to 40 percent.

Why? Mostly because pilots are refusing to work overtime.

That simple job action is shining a bright light on a dirty
secret that United shares with many companies: Instead of
hiring enough people for good-paying jobs, they plan
production or service based on speedup and overwork. Most
employers would rather pay overtime than hire more workers
with the complete wage-and-benefit package that entails.

That’s been the tune at United. Now the airline is paying
the piper. Ten thousand members of the Air Line Pilots
union are exercising their right to work only their regular
full-time schedules. As a result, United has had to cancel
hundreds of flights every day this summer.

One-quarter of United is supposedly "owned" by its
employees. But the "employee stock ownership plan"
provisions covering wages expired April 12. Pilots are
demanding significant pay and benefit improvements to make
up for the years of cuts they endured under the ESOP.

Author:

News Service: Workers World News Service

URL: http://www.workers.org

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