Electric Vehicle Technology Does Exist and Can Kick Ass in Energy Efficiency, Pollution Reduction, and Safety: Check Honda’s Insight

TORRANCE, Calif., Feb. 23 – The American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE) has recognized the Honda Insight as the number one gasoline-powered performer in its annual ACEEE’s Green Book: The Environmental Guide to Cars and Trucks – Model Year 2001. The Insight and the natural gas powered Civic GX tied for the top spot. In addition, the Civic HX grabbed the best vehicle in class award being cited as a “Greener Choice.”


The American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE) has recognized the Honda Insight as the number one gasoline-powered performer in its annual ACEEE’s Green Book: The Environmental Guide to Cars and Trucks – Model Year 2001. The Insight and the natural gas powered Civic GX tied for the top spot. In addition, the Civic HX grabbed the best vehicle in class award being cited as a “Greener Choice.”

The Highest Score

The “Greener Choices” rating system gives each 2001 model year vehicle a score based on tailpipe emissions and fuel economy, and the pollutants that are emitted during a vehicle’s manufacturing process. The Insight received a Green Score of 52, the highest on the list. Fuel Economy is a key factor in ACEEE’s rankings, and the Insight’s 61city/68highway EPA ratings are the best in the industry.

The Honda Insight was introduced in 1999 as the first gasoline-electric hybrid on sale in the U.S. The ‘Ultra-Low Emission’ Insight features Honda’s Integrated Motor Assist (IMA) system — a 1.0-liter, 3-cylinder gasoline engine combined with a lightweight and compact 144-volt electric motor.

The IMA system, combined with a rigid aluminum body structure and world-class aerodynamic design, gives the Insight the ability to achieve 68 miles per gallon of gasoline (EPA highway estimate). Plus, it meets California’s stringent Ultra-Low-Emission Vehicle (ULEV) standard, making it one of the world’s cleanest, most fuel-efficient gasoline-powered automobiles.

Because its primary motive power comes from its VTECâ„¢-E gasoline engine, the Insight drives just like any other automobile. It has a 10.6-gallon gas tank, and no external power supply is needed for recharging. Batteries are recharged by regenerative braking. Specifically, energy from forward momentum is captured during braking. This energy is then used to recharge the batteries.

The Insight’s lightweight aluminum body and reinforced frame are 47-percent lighter than a comparable steel body and have superior bending and torsional rigidity. And its highly aerodynamic body has one of the lowest coefficients of drag (0.25) of any mass-produced automobile.

The Insight does not require an outside source of electric power – it never needs to be plugged in. In 2000, U.S. EPA honored Honda and the Insight with its ‘Climate Protection Award’ for leadership and technical innovation. In addition, the Insight has accumulated numerous accolades including:

Accolades from the respected

Popular Mechanics “Design & Engineering” Award

Automobile Magazine “2000 Technology of the Year”

Popular Science “Best of What’s New” Award

American Woman Motorscene “Most Likely to Change the World”

Clean Car Coalition “Clean Car Salute”

Edmunds.com “Most Significant New Vehicle”

Sierra Club “Environmental Engineering” Award

Background

The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy is a nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing energy efficiency as a means of promoting both economic prosperity and environmental protection. ACEEE fulfills its mission by:

  • Conducting in-depth technical and policy assessments
  • Advising policymakers and program managers
  • Working collaboratively with businesses, public interest groups, and other organizations
  • Publishing books, conference proceedings, and reports
  • Organizing conferences and workshops
  • Educating consumers and businesses

Projects are carried out by staff and selected energy efficiency experts from universities, national laboratories, and the private sector. ACEEE’s program areas include:

  • National, Regional, and State Energy Policy
  • Buildings, Appliances and Equipment
  • Utilities
  • Industry
  • Transportation
  • International
  • Human Dimensions
  • Publications and Conferences

Collaboration is key to ACEEE’s success. They collaborate on projects and initiatives with dozens of organizations including federal and state agencies, utilities, research institutions, businesses, and public interest groups.

ACEEE is not a membership organization. However, they send out notices of publications, conferences, and other activities to over 30,000 individuals. Support for their work comes from a broad range of foundations, governmental organizations, research institutes, utilities, and corporations.

contact @www.aceee.org

Author: American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy

News Service: Honda

URL: http://www.honda2001.com/models/insight/press.html