Defining Peace Through Technology And Weapons Of Mass Destruction

Common sense or the “good” within us says we will take all necessary precautions to protect life on this planet but the current reality indicates a different story that “evil” has found and is willing to use technology for death and mass destruction. The blame could be ours when we think of those who have limited the guidelines on research and development, persuading us that the institutes of the world and our collective conscience will rule and prevent the potential evil use of technology. Today’s reality is that large institutes or major governments cannot govern the development of inexpensive technologies now or in the future.

Common sense or the “good” within us says we will take all necessary precautions to protect life on this planet but the current reality indicates a different story that “evil” has found and is willing to use technology for death and mass destruction. The blame could be ours when we think of those who have limited the guidelines on research and development, persuading us that the institutes of the world and our collective conscience will rule and prevent the potential evil use of technology. Today’s reality is that large institutes or major governments cannot govern the development of inexpensive technologies now or in the future.

Lets face the facts that our technology is being used by fanatics as we use smart bombs on smart terrorists and begin to look for new ways to build smaller more efficient nuclear weapons. Do we have the wisdom to face the challenge of finding world peace without weapons of mass destruction or military actions? Maybe we need to find a common ground by identifying non human enemies to focus on. Enemies like asteroid impacts, global epidemics, biotech disasters, particle accelerator mishaps, nano-technology disasters, environmental toxins or even starvation (45,000 people starve to death every day) which generate interactions among people in a cooperative way. It causes social and scientific organizations of diverse peoples and ethnic backgrounds to willingly cooperate for the benefit of all humankind.

The suggestion here is that peace is something beyond what can be achieved by any traditional system or sovereign state and that war is not a general law nor does it promote human progress. Most people in the world want peace and yet last year alone there was at least forty-one regions throughout the world that were involved in some form of armed conflict. If the facts are to be known; modern governments have killed 147,000,000 people. Think of how many of the most gifted people have been exterminated by genocide or have been subjugated by wars of aggression, oppression, attrition, liberation, religion or race. Maybe its time for us to rethink our approach in defining peace.

The terrorist attacks last year have underscored the violent nature of the current social and political reality of our planet. Choices need to be made by our current leaders in order to sustain human existence. We need to force ourselves as individuals to actively participate in creating peace in the most fundamental way. We now have the opportunity to redefine and build effective peace institutions in conjunction with phasing out and even abolishing institutes of war. The primary tool should be teaching for peace not just eluding to some phantom we call peace through the sights of thousands of nuclear missiles pointed at the rest of the world.As long as rival ideas remain, we will always have war. We will only find harmony in the glory of life and in the hearts of human beings if we celebrate our diversity and look at ourselves and others as part of one race which would include Iraq, Iran, Syria, Israel, Palestine, North Korea etc.

By:

Doug Snedden
doug.snedden@sympatico.ca

Author: Doug Snedden

News Service: TheExperiment Submission