Breaking the Media Silence on Iraq

Los Angeles – More than 1.5 million people have died since 1990 as a result of U.S. sanctions against Iraq.
President Bill Clinton’s
administration has blocked every effort in the UN to lift
the sanctions.

U.S. and British air strikes against civilian targets in
Iraq continue almost daily.


Los Angeles – More than 1.5 million people have died since 1990 as a result of U.S. sanctions against Iraq.
President Bill Clinton’s
administration has blocked every effort in the UN to lift
the sanctions.

U.S. and British air strikes against civilian targets in
Iraq continue almost daily.

On Aug. 15 a rally was held outside the Democratic National
Convention in Los Angeles to demand an end to the U.S./
United Nations war and sanctions against Iraq.

More than 1,000 people participated in the protest.

During a moment of silence, participants held up 250 small
coffins, each with the name and picture of an Iraqi child on
it. The coffins dramatically symbolized the number of Iraqi
children who die each day as a result of the sanctions.

Later, protestors lined a narrow sidewalk through which the
thousands of delegates had to pass to return to their
hotels.

The demonstration received extensive media coverage. The
Associated Press and Reuters news services filed stories and
photos that appeared in many newspapers across the United
States and abroad. Arabic-language television stations also
covered the rally. It was widely seen in the Middle East and
in Arab American communities.

At the rally, Magda Miller of the Iraq Sanctions Challenge introduced a
group of young people who defied sanctions by taking
medicine to Iraq. They included Forrest Schmidt, Sarah Sloan
and this writer.

Author: Nancy Mitchell

News Service: Workers World News Service

URL: http://www.workers.org

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: